If Hollywood is So Creative, Why are Streaming Services Pricing Plans So Boring?

Streaming services are the big rage…got it! Here’s the problem – instead of aggregating and creating discounted bundles. Instead, each streaming services is selling “take it all or nothing” deals. Cobbling together a few services to watch favorite shows will be pricey.

Please check out my latest Harvard Business Review article that argues that streaming services need to put a little more thought into their pricing strategies and provide more affordable options.

As always, thank you for reading (blogs have been slow this year as I’m writing a new book).

Posted on November 12th, 2019 (0 Comments)

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Resort Fees – and other Bait & Surcharge Schemes – Should be Banned

Tacking on hidden mandatory surcharges are becoming increasingly popular in pricing. I just realized that Sprint charges me an unadvertised (and inescapable) $5 administrative fee every month. Comcast is adding unadvertised “franchise fees” to my cable bill. And don’t get me started on restaurants that add a 3% “kitchen appreciation fee” as a line item to the check.

Please check out my latest article for the Harvard Business Review which posits that the only reason for these hidden mandatory surcharges is to deceive customers…and this practice should be banned.

Posted on February 26th, 2019 (0 Comments)

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Netflix's Price Increase Should Concern Investors

Netflix recently instituted a 12% – 18% price increase for its streaming services. A few bucks isn’t going to cause a mass exodus, but it does create opportunities for current rivals (Hulu, Amazon) as well as those on the horizon. AT&T, Disney, Comcast, and Apple are all rumored to be entering the streaming market. That’s pretty formidable competition!

Please check out my first piece for Barron’s as it pitches (and supports) two contrarian ideas: (1) In direct contrast to most analysts, I think Netflix’s future uber-success is far from a slam-dunk and (2) I argue that Netflix’s decision on whether to raise prices has not been an elasticity issue – it’s been a valuation decision.

As always, thank you for reading!

Posted on January 30th, 2019 (1 Comments)

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